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18-Aug-2017
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European Space Agency (ESA) Missions

Launch: 2022

JUICE

JUICE - JUpiter ICy moons Explorer - is the first large-class mission in ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. Planned for launch in 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in 2030, it will spend at least three years making detailed observations of the giant gaseous planet Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa.

See ESA Website for Mission Overview.

(Image: ESA)

Launch: 2022

EUCLID

Euclid is an ESA mission to map the geometry of the dark Universe. The mission will investigate the distance-redshift relationship and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies and clusters of galaxies out to redshifts ~2, or equivalently to a look-back time of 10 billion years. In this way, Euclid will cover the entire period over which dark energy played a significant role in accelerating the expansion

See ESA Website for Mission Overview.

(Image: ESA)

Launch: April 2014

Sentinel-1

The Sentinels, a new fleet of ESA satellites, are poised to deliver the wealth of data and imagery that are central to Copernicus programme. The first in the series, Sentinel-1, carries an advanced radar instrument to provide an all-weather, day-and-night supply of imagery of Earth surface. The C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) builds on ESA and Canada heritage SAR systems on ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat and Radarsat. As a constellation of two satellites orbiting 180 degrees apart, the mission images the entire Earth every six days. As well as transmitting data to a number of ground stations around the world for rapid dissemination, Sentinel-1 also carries a laser to transmit data to the geostationary European Data Relay System for continual data delivery.

See ESA Website for Mission Overview.

(Image: ESA)

Launch: 2016

BepiColombo MPO

Consisting of two orbiters, BepiColombo will provide the most complete exploration yet of Mercury, the innermost planet. ESA's Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) will map the planet, studying its geology, composition, inner structure, and exosphere.

JAXA are developing the BepiColumbo MMO (Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter).

See ESA Website for Mission Overview or Mission Details.

(Image: ESA)

Launch: December 2011

Gaia

Gaia is a global space astrometry mission. Its goal is to make the largest, most precise map of our Galaxy by surveying an unprecedented number of stars - more than a thousand million.

See ESA Website for Mission Overview or Mission Details.

(Image: ESA)

Launch: 2011

James Webb Space Telescope

The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, and it will be almost three times the size of Hubble. JWST has been designed to work best at infrared wavelengths. This will allow it to study the very distant Universe, looking for the first stars and galaxies that ever emerged.

The JWST is being developed in partnership with NASA.

See ESA Website for Mission Overview or Mission Details.

(Image: ESA)

Launch: July 2007

Herschel

Herschel will be the largest space telescope of its kind when launched. Herschelís 3.5-metre diameter mirror will collect long-wavelength infrared radiation from some of the coolest and most distant objects in the Universe. Herschel will be the only space observatory to cover the range from far-infrared to submillimetre wavelengths.

See ESA Website for Mission Overview or Mission Details.

(Image: ESA)

Launch: June 2006

Corot

Corot will be the first mission capable of detecting rocky planets, several times larger than Earth, around nearby stars. It consists of a 30-centimetre space telescope and will be launched in early 2006.

See ESA Website for Mission Overview or Mission Details.

(Image: ESA)

Launch: 2006

GOCE

The Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mission will measure high-accuracy gravity gradients and provide global models of the Earth's gravity field and of the geoid.

See ESA Website for details.

(Image: ESA)

 

International Space Station European Drawer Rack (ISS EDR)

Once completed, the 450-tonne International Space Station (ISS) will have more than 1200 cubic metres of pressurized space - enough room for seven crew and a vast array of scientific experiments.

The European Drawer Rack (EDR) provides a flexible experiment carrier for a large variety of scientific disciplines, and provides the accommodation and resources to experiment with modules housed within standardised drawers and lockers.

See ESA Website for details.

(Image: ESA)

 

CryoSat

CryoSat is a three-year radar altimetry mission to determine variations in the thickness of the Earthís continental ice sheets and marine ice cover. Its primary objective is to test the prediction of thinning arctic ice due to global warming.

See ESA Website for details.

(Image: ESA)

Launched 2nd March 2004

Rosetta

Rosetta will be the first mission ever to land on a comet. It will study the nucleus of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and its environment in great detail for a period of nearly two years, and land a probe on its surface.

See ESA Website for Mission Overview or Mission Details.

In Mars Orbit (Launched 2nd June 2003)

Mars Express

Mars Express is Europeís first spacecraft to the Red Planet. It carries seven instruments and a lander. The orbiter instruments are remotely investigating the Martian atmosphere, surface and subsurface.

See ESA Website for Mission Overview or Mission Details.

(Image: ESA)

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